Frying Pan News Launches Series on Proposition 32

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September 13, 2012 in Labor & Economy, Politics & Government

Today Frying Pan News launches a series of investigations into Proposition 32, a measure on the November ballot that, if passed, would drastically alter the political landscape in California. “Killing the California Dream” will shed light on Prop. 32’s backers and their motivations; analyze how major public policy decisions would be affected if Prop. 32 passes; and document how corporate money historically has run counter to the interests of most Californians, among other things. The series will run through the November 6 election.

“If Proposition 32 passes, corporate donations will flat-out dominate politics in California,” said Steven Mikulan, editor of Frying Pan News. “We’ve launched this investigative series to provide California voters with the facts about who is behind the measure and how the passage of Prop. 32 would enable corporations to determine policy on everything from health care, pensions and workplace safety to the environment, education and consumer protection. With so much at stake for California, voters deserve to be armed with all of information they need to make an educated decision on November 6.”

In conjunction with the launch, Lalo Alcaraz, one of the most famous political cartoonists in the country, has created a Prop. 32 cartoon, “Millionaires Man’s March.” The cartoon features a group of millionaires, representing the backers of Proposition 32, marching down the street with “1%” and supportive Prop 32 signs.

The first piece in the “Killing the California Dream” series sheds light on some of the major backers of Prop. 32 and their right-wing agenda. Author Matthew Fleischer concludes that “it’s the moneyed figures lurking in the shadows who tell the true story of this initiative.” In the coming weeks, the series will feature further investigations into the machinery behind Prop. 32 and examine what California would look like if the measure were to pass.

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